Scott Carter: 'The Shape of Things'


Private View: Thursday, 20 Feburary, 2014 / 6-9pm
Exhibition Dates: 21 Feb - 5 April, 2014 
 
Beers Contemporary is proud to present The Shape of Things, the first UK solo exhibition by American artist Scott Carter including brand new sculptural works and unique installations. 

Carter has engaged in two week specific 'residency' on-site at Beers Contemporary, transforming the gallery space in the days prior to the opening of the exhibition, creating an immersive installation that includes numerous sculptural and two-dimensional pieces using only the materials that are encompassed within - and sourced from - the gallery infrastructure itself.

Carter's artistic practice encompasses a wide artistic discourse, including art, design, architecture, and even sound, but always relate to the nature of space and its relationship to the individual. Deriving from a tactile sense for materials, Carter's process is undoubtedly unique: upon entering the exhibition space, his response is both performative and sculptural. From the raw materials by which he is surrounded, transforms the concept of space and architecture, literally excavating sections of the wall, (or even flooring) and reconstructing new artworks from those raw materials. With such a dependency on materiality, Carter's work remains whimsical, referential, and personal, managing to transcend their base materiality, as his source materials (at once reduced to their origins) are elevated and imbued with newness of form and function.

Through the process of examining materials, Carter analyses his, and our, own placement in time and space. Inevitably, this process calls attention to human fallibility, our alienation from the natural world, meditation, and spiritualism as one attempts to assert alternate meaning in the built environment. Through Carter's actions, subtle idiosyncrasies reveal themselves, coinciding with the physicality of domestic life, ideas of the museum space, and aims to categorize the limitlessness of imagination. These interventions, ultimately, amount to concise, playful and creative critiques of the way we experience space and the belongings, memories, and items that inhabit our world and define us as humans.